Tea leaves and local control

The outcome of Tuesday’s special election in Wisconsin’s 10th State Senate District sent ripples, if not shock waves, through the political waters. Democrats are thrilled and point to the unexpected win of their candidate, Patty Schachtner in a Republican-leaning seat as one more sign of a national pro-left wave that has been building since the Presidential election. Republicans are publicly-voicing concern that the electorate’s not hearing their message. As a card-carrying member of the political chatterers, I’ll admit it’s been a couple days of fascinating tea-leaf-parsing. And one of those leaves seems to be pointing at local control.

For the first time in a long time, I heard the words “local control” in the post-election analysis. Both Republican and Democratic commentators say that local issues, including control over local zoning, played a prominent role in the election. Republican Candidate Adam Jarchow, as a member of the State Assembly, was an outspoken opponent of local governments on land use. Jarchow was well-known, well-funded, and according to all reports, ran a very credible campaign. And then he lost. And land use played a big role.

“We absolutely believe local issues motivated people in this race,” said Democratic opinionizer Stan Gruszynski in today’s Wisconsin State Journal.

“Local issues matter and Republicans have to re-evaluate how they’re talking about them,” said Republican pundit Jim Villa.

Both men were alluding to Jarchow’s support for limits on local zoning regulations.

One election does not a wave make. Two comments in the newspaper do not signal legislative intent to restore the full spirit and meaning of the Home Rule Amendment to the Wisconsin Constitution. A huge anti-city, anti-village bill, AB 770, continues to move through the Legislature. But just maybe Tuesday’s election will freeze bills like this in their tracks. Or at least it may cause Legislators to think about how they will explain votes for such bills to the village board members back home. That’s a pretty good tea leaf.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s