Another assessment win

If you tell a bank that your property is worth $450 million, chances are you won’t win an argument claiming your property tax assessment of $400 million is too high. That’s one of the morals of this most recent property assessment story. On May 9 the City of Wauwatosa won the largest, most complicated retail property assessment challenges to date. By order of a judge, super-regional Mayfair Mall is worth what the assessor said it’s worth (and probably more), not what 20 less attractive malls are worth.

The Mayfair Mall property tax saga began in 2013 when the city of Wauwatosa pegged the property’s value at $400 million. The city’s data suggested the property was worth about ten-percent more than that amount, but the assessor went with the more conservative figure in part because he didn’t have access to income information that had been repeatedly requested from the owner. The assessment was the same for 2014 and raised by roughly 5-percent for 2015. The real estate investment trust that owned Mayfair sued, claiming the city assessments were in error.

A four-year court battle ensued. A year ago, both sides met in Milwaukee County Circuit Court for a six-week trial. The trial became a dense and complicated contest of competing experts. Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Marshall B. Murray issued his written decision in favor of the city this month. His 34-page written decision carefully details how Wauwatosa Assessors Steve Miner and (later) Shannon Krause repeatedly used correct data, scrupulously-followed the Wisconsin Property Assessment Manual and assigned values that were conservatively-beneath the actual value of the property.

On the other side, the experts hired by Mayfair to justify its claim that the assessment was wrong were repeatedly found to be “inconsistent and not credible” by the judge. In some instances, the judge’s decision points out that the owner’s experts contradicted their own previous work. Mayfair had an appraisal done to finance the mall, putting its value at about $460 million. One of the experts who challenged the $400 million assessment worked for the firm that had done the appraisal. (Just one of the facts that Judge Murray pointed out in his “inconsistent and not credible” finding.)

Although Mayfair’s challenge did not turn on the “dark store” theory directly, the decision is an important element in the ongoing legislative debate. It is unquestionably the largest, most complicated retail assessment challenge in the recent string of property tax decisions. Two of Wisconsin’s best municipal assessors, Miner and Krause, were central figures in assigning the values to the property and the case was defended by expert municipal tax attorneys Amy Seibel and Ryan Braithwaite. The other side brought its legal A-team as well, and both sides relied on leading national experts in assessment and appraisal. The case was as expertly-argued as an assessment case can be…and the municipal side won on all points.

Despite the importance of this win, the fight continues. In Wauwatosa, there are related cases from more recent tax years still under appeal, and this decision may be appealed to a higher court. Wauwatosa Mayor Kathy Ehley has said her city budgets more for assessment-related legal fees annually than it receives in shared revenue payments; more than a quarter of a million per year.

Ironically, the same week Judge Murray rejected Mayfair’s appeal the Wisconsin Legislature’s budget-writing committee rejected a proposal to clarify the law. The Joint Committee on Finance voted 11-3 against League-supported Dark Store language in the state budget. Apparently, legislation that would help Wauwatosa and other Wisconsin municipalities not spend $250,000 per year on legal fees is not “fiscal policy” suitable for a state budget.

Stay tuned.

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